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Archive for the ‘Nathan Charles Ridlehoover’ Category

The State of New Testament Studies

In Baker Academic, Nathan Charles Ridlehoover, New Testament, Nijay K. GUPTA, Research Currents, Scot McKnight on January 16, 2020 at 4:00 pm

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2020.1.2 | Scot McKnight and Nijay K. Gupta, eds. The State of New Testament Studies: A Survey of Recent Research. Grand Rapids: Baker Academic, 2019. ISBN: 9780801098796.

Review by Charles Nathan Ridlehoover, Columbia International Seminary.

The State of New Testament Studies begins with the story of an aspiring academic (Gupta) entering seminary with the goal of learning the “world” of New Testament studies. As many will remember, the one-stop-shop for such an overview was the indispensable The Face of New Testament Studies. The beauty of the story is that the aspiring academic received the The Face of New Testament studies, was gripped by its contents, and now has had the occasion to revamp the original volume with one of the original editors (Scot McKnight). In what follows, Nijay K. Gupta and Scot McKnight explain the new face of NT studies, or in this case, the state of fifteen years of progress (and maybe even a bit of digression) in the field. Read the rest of this entry »

The Lord’s Prayer

In C. Clifton Black, Lord's Prayer, Matthew, Nathan Charles Ridlehoover, Westminster John Knox on November 27, 2019 at 4:00 pm

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2019.11.16 | C. Clifton Black. The Lord’s Prayer. Interpretation. Louisville: WJK, 2018. ISBN: 978-0664234898.

Review by Charles Nathan Ridlehoover, Columbia International Seminary.

C. Clifton Black has been the Otto A. Piper Professor of Biblical Theology at Princeton Theological Seminary since 1999. Black’s previous appointments include Southern Methodist University, the University of Rochester, and Duke University. Black’s treatment of the Lord’s Prayer is the newest volume in the Interpretation supplement series. These volumes are designed to supplement the regular commentaries by examining more specific texts that have played an important role in the faith and life of the Christian community.

In the following volume, Clifton Black provides a wealth of resources for the inquiring pray-er of the Lord’s Prayer. His volume has come about during a miniature renaissance of Lord’s Prayer studies. Read the rest of this entry »

Christobiography

In Craig S. KEENER, Gospels, Historical Jesus, Narratology, Nathan Charles Ridlehoover on October 18, 2019 at 4:00 pm

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2019.10.13 | Craig S. Keener. Christobiography: Memory, History, and the Reliability of the Gospels. Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 2019. ISBN 978-0-8028-7675-1.

Review by Charles Nathan Ridlehoover, Columbia International Seminary.

Scholars in the New Testament guild need no introduction to the work of Craig Keener. Keener has been one of the modern masters of long-form scholarship in the field of biblical studies. Following on the heels of his work on Acts and miracles, Keener returns to the question of the Gospels’ reliability and historical Jesus. The following volume is Keener’s efforts to situate the Gospels more precisely in the ranging spectrum of Greco-Roman biographies. Keener does not view his research as another volume in historical Jesus studies, but rather, a contribution to the epistemology of historical Jesus research. Read the rest of this entry »

Memory and the Jesus Tradition

In Alan KIRK, Bloomsbury, Fourfold Gospel, Gospels, Historical Jesus, Memory, Nathan Charles Ridlehoover, Synoptic Gospels on September 20, 2019 at 2:00 pm

9780567680242

2019.9.10 | Alan Kirk. Memory and the Jesus Tradition. The Reception of Jesus in the First Three Centuries 2. London: Bloomsbury, 2018. ISBN 978-0-56-768024-2.

Review by Charles Nathan Ridlehoover.

Alan Kirk is Professor in the Department of Philosophy and Religion at James Madison University. Kirk provides the second installment in the newly minted Reception of Jesus in the First Three Centuriesseries with Memory and the Jesus Tradition. The following volume is the culmination of 15 years of research concerning the Jesus tradition and memory. Kirk’s work analyzes how memory traces the Jesus tradition from its inception to its codification. Each essay contained in the book is from previously published work, but ingeniously arranged under four rubrics: Part I: “Formation of the Jesus Tradition,” Part II: “Memory and Manuscript,” Part III: “Memory and Historical Jesus Research,” and Part IV: “Memory in Second-Century Gospel Writing.” Read the rest of this entry »