Reviews of

The Construction of Gender and Identity in Genesis

In Bloomsbury, Gender Studies, Genesis, HB/OT, Hebrew Bible, Karalina Matskevich, Lindsay Fraughton, T & T Clark on August 6, 2020 at 7:09 am

9780567695512

2020.08.14 | Karalina Matskevich. The Construction of Gender and Identity in Genesis: The Subject and the Other. T&T Clark, 2019. ISBN: 9780567695512.

Review by Lindsay Fraughton, University of British Columbia.

From the Documentary Hypothesis to the construction of The Woman’s Bible, scholarly approaches to the Book of Genesis have shifted alongside academic and social movements. Structuralism, fathered in biblical studies by Claude Lévi-Strauss and furthered by scholars like Mieke Bal and Ellen van Wolde, lost traction in the 21st century (Matskevich 2019, 208). However, in her 2019 publication Construction of Gender and Identity in Genesis: The Subject and the Other, Karalina Matskevich revitalises interdisciplinary structuralist approaches to the book of Genesis, setting the groundwork for future studies of the same nature.

The New Testament in Comparison

In B. G. White, Bloomsbury, Comparison, Graeco-Roman Backgrounds, John BARCLAY, Joshua W. Jipp, New Testament, Stoicism on July 17, 2020 at 3:00 pm

the-new-testament-in-comparison

2020.07.13 | John M. G. Barclay and B. G. White (editors). The New Testament in Comparison: Validity, Method, and Purpose in Comparing Traditions. Library of New Testament Studies 600. London: T&T Clark, 2020.

Review by Joshua W. Jipp, Trinity Evangelical Divinity School. 

The publication of Karl Barth’s Römerbrief in 1919 elicited the statement from a Catholic theologian that the commentary fell like a bomb on the playground of the theologians. Respected New Testament scholars referred to Barth as a gnostic and an enemy of historical critical interpretation (Adolf Jülicher), a Biblicist (Paul Wernle), and as using the commentary as a pretense for theological autobiography (Adolf Schlatter). For reasons that need not concern us here, Barth’s commentary on Romans simultaneously set forth a biting critique of historical criticism, at least insofar as it could penetrate the subject matter of the NT texts, and offered a radically different way of approaching exegesis. As such, Barth’s book appeared as something that was virtually incomprehensible to his fellow colleagues.

Aseneth’s Transformation

In Aseneth, De Gruyter, Deuterocanonical, Kristen Marie Hartvigsen, R. Gillian Glass on July 3, 2020 at 6:00 pm

2020.07.12 | Kirsten Marie Hartvigsen. Aseneth’s Transformation. DCLS 24. Berlin/Boston: De Gruyter, 2018. XII + 246. ISBN: 978-3-11-036337-1.

Review by R. Gillian Glass, University of British Columbia.

In her second book, Kirsten Marie Hartvigsen (hereafter H.) presents readers with a multi-disciplinary analysis of Joseph and Aseneth, an ancient Judeo-Greek romance, in which she examines the multiple symbolic and ritual elements of the heroine’s transformation. H. applies three modern theories to this ancient narrative in order to explicate and contextualize the interpretations of these elements that have been advanced by scholars (34).

Her book has a clear structure. After an introduction (chapter 1) with the requisite review of scholarship of Joseph and Aseneth, and presentation of her methodology, H. dedicates a chapter to each of her three chosen methodological frameworks: Intersectionality (chapter 2), Conceptual Blending Theory and Intertextual Blending (chapter 3), and Cognitive Theory of Ritual and Ritual Efficacy (chapter 4).