Reviews of

The Literary Imagination in Jewish Antiquity

In Canon, Eva MROCZEK, Hebrew Bible, Oxford University Press, Scribal culture, Second Temple, Shelby Bennet on December 11, 2019 at 11:56 pm

9780190279837

2019.12.17| Eva Mroczek. The Literary Imagination in Jewish Antiquity. New York: Oxford University Press, 2016. pp xi+269. ISBN: 9780190886080.

Review by Shelby Bennet, Trinity Western University

(previously reviewed by Jeremiah Coogan: here)

Eva Mroczek makes a powerful contribution to re-thinking a central concept in Judaism and Christianity: “canon.” She explores and challenges the role and purpose of those who composed sacred texts that fall both inside and outside the covers of modern biblical collections. The book places the reader in the Second Temple period’s literary culture and illuminates a world teeming with scripture, but without a Bible.

The first chapter introduces a dominant theme of the book: the impact of a post-printing press “book” culture on our understanding of the Jewish literary culture that produced the Old Testament and Hebrew Bible. Mroczek argues that anachronistic concepts of canon and “book” still shape biblical scholarship today despite awareness of the issue. Scholars still distinguish “biblical” from “non-biblical” texts in ways that ancients did not and conduct research based upon those constructions of, pre- or misconceptions, of authority and stability. Mroczek uses the “book of Psalms” at Qumran to demonstrate that there was no set order or content for the book of Psalms at that point.

The Lord’s Prayer

In C. Clifton Black, Lord's Prayer, Matthew, Nathan Charles Ridlehoover, Westminster John Knox on November 27, 2019 at 4:00 pm

The-Lords-Prayer

2019.11.16 | C. Clifton Black. The Lord’s Prayer. Interpretation. Louisville: WJK, 2018. ISBN: 978-0664234898.

Review by Charles Nathan Ridlehoover, Columbia International Seminary.

C. Clifton Black has been the Otto A. Piper Professor of Biblical Theology at Princeton Theological Seminary since 1999. Black’s previous appointments include Southern Methodist University, the University of Rochester, and Duke University. Black’s treatment of the Lord’s Prayer is the newest volume in the Interpretation supplement series. These volumes are designed to supplement the regular commentaries by examining more specific texts that have played an important role in the faith and life of the Christian community.

In the following volume, Clifton Black provides a wealth of resources for the inquiring pray-er of the Lord’s Prayer. His volume has come about during a miniature renaissance of Lord’s Prayer studies.

Simply Come Copying

In Alan Taylor Farnes, Early Christianity, Manuscript Studies, Manuscripts, Matthew Burks, Mohr Siebeck, New Testament, Scribal habits, Textual Criticism on November 13, 2019 at 4:00 pm

Alan-Taylor-Farnes+Simply-Come-Copying

2019.11.15 | Alan Taylor Farnes. Simply Come Copying: Direct Copies as Test Cases in the Quest for Scribal Habits. WUNT II 481. Tubingen: Mohr Siebeck, 2019. XV + 253 pp. ISBN 978-3-16-156981-4.

Review by Matthew Burks, New Orleans Baptist Theological Seminary.

Alan Taylor Farnes currently teaches adjunctly at Brigham Young University. He completed his doctoral degree at the University of Birmingham in 2017. Also, Dr. Farnes holds a master’s degree from Duke University and a bachelor’s degree from Brigham Young University. This work is the published form of his dissertation titled “Scribal Habits in Selected New Testament Manuscripts, Including Those with Surviving Exemplars.”

A major method of study in the field of textual criticism is the singular reading method.