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Archive for the ‘Scot McKnight’ Category

The State of New Testament Studies

In Baker Academic, Nathan Charles Ridlehoover, New Testament, Nijay K. GUPTA, Research Currents, Scot McKnight on January 16, 2020 at 4:00 pm

9781493419807

2020.01.02 | Scot McKnight and Nijay K. Gupta, eds. The State of New Testament Studies: A Survey of Recent Research. Grand Rapids: Baker Academic, 2019. ISBN: 9780801098796.

Review by Charles Nathan Ridlehoover, Columbia International Seminary.

The State of New Testament Studies begins with the story of an aspiring academic (Gupta) entering seminary with the goal of learning the “world” of New Testament studies. As many will remember, the one-stop-shop for such an overview was the indispensable The Face of New Testament Studies. The beauty of the story is that the aspiring academic received the The Face of New Testament studies, was gripped by its contents, and now has had the occasion to revamp the original volume with one of the original editors (Scot McKnight). In what follows, Nijay K. Gupta and Scot McKnight explain the new face of NT studies, or in this case, the state of fifteen years of progress (and maybe even a bit of digression) in the field. Read the rest of this entry »

Jesus is Lord, Caesar is Not: Evaluating Empire in New Testament Studies

In Empire, InterVarsity Press, Joseph B. MODICA, New Testament, Scot McKnight, Steve Walton on February 20, 2015 at 9:32 pm

McKnight

2015.02.05 | Scot McKnight & Joseph B. Modica (eds.). Jesus is Lord, Caesar is Not: Evaluation Empire in New Testament Studies. Downers Grove, IL: IVP Academic, 2013.

Review by Professor Steve Walton, St Mary’s University, Twickenham & Tyndale House, Cambridge.

Many thanks to IVP for providing a review copy.

This is a clear, lucid and accessible collection of essays looking at the New Testament in the light of recent discussions about the presence of criticism (implied or explicit) of the Roman empire by the earliest Christians. The book would be good for undergraduates or seminary/theological college students, and provides a helpful ‘way in’ to the topic, with good summaries of key positions and arguments, as well as thoughtful critiques. The overall perspective is fairly sceptical of an anti-imperial view, especially in a form that implies that critique of the Roman empire is central to the purpose of the NT author(s), and that should lead Christians today to be suspicious of all empires (not least, the implied American imperial rule in today’s world). Read the rest of this entry »