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Archive for the ‘Patristics’ Category

Tätige Nächstenliebe in Werk und Wirken Gregors des Grossen

In Arnold Smeets, Gregory the Great, Mohr Siebeck, Patristics, Susanne Barth on June 9, 2022 at 9:47 pm

2022.06.07 | Susanne Barth. Tätige Nächstenliebe in Werk und Wirken Gregors des Grossen. Studien und Texte zu Antike und Christentum 122. Tübingen: Mohr Siebeck, 2021. ISBN 978-3-16-156303-4. pp. xiii, 449.

Review by Arnold Smeets, Tilburg School of Catholic Theology, Utrecht.

The English title of this book, as mentioned on the publisher’s website: Acts of Charity in the Works and Endeavours of Gregory the Great, is clear enough, but, I think, misses an important point. Susanne Barth’s book is not just on the acts of charity but more on active charity. Gregory the Great was focused on doing charity, making the difference, both in words and in deeds. His diaconal-caritative theology of active neighbourly love (‘eine diakonisch-karitative Theologie der tätigen Nächstenliebe’, 392), is not so much an effect of a vision after studying and contemplating Scripture, but more the foundation, inspiration and blueprint of how he saw his mission as a Christian Roman and (later) bishop of Rome.

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Patristic Literature in Arabic Translations

In Adrian Pirtea, Alexandria TREIGER, Arabic Manuscripts, Barbara Roggema, Brill, Patristics, Translation on April 13, 2021 at 12:37 pm
Cover Patristic Literature in Arabic Translations

2021.4.9 | Barbara Roggema, Alexander Treiger, eds. Patristic Literature in Arabic Translations. Arabic Christianity 2. Leiden/Boston: Brill, 2020. ISBN: 9789004414945.

Review by Adrian C. Pirtea, University of Vienna.

Despite many significant advances over the past decades, Arabic Christian literature remains one of the least explored literary corpora of Eastern and Oriental Christianity. In part, this is certainly due to the sheer amount of authors, texts and manuscripts available: an inventory of the Christian Arabic translations alone make up the daunting first volume of Georg Graf’s five-volume Geschichte der christlichen arabischen Literatur (Città del Vaticano, 1944-1953). Together with a growing awareness of the relevance of Arabic Bible translations, scholars are increasingly turning their attention to the equally important body of Greek (but also Syriac, Coptic, Latin, etc.) Patristic translations into Arabic.

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Tradition and Innovation

In Baptism, Brill, Mystagogy, Narsai of Nisibis, Nathan WITKAMP, Patristics, Sofia Puchkova, Theodore of Mopsuestia on January 4, 2021 at 1:49 pm
Cover Tradition and Innovation: Baptismal Rite and Mystagogy in Theodore of Mopsuestia and Narsai of Nisibis

2021.1.1 | Nathan Witkamp. Tradition and Innovation: Baptismal Rite and Mystagogy in Theodore of Mopsuestia and Narsai of Nisibis. Supplements to Vigiliae Chrisitanae 149. Leiden, Boston: Brill, 2018. ISBN 9789004377851.

Review by Sofia Puchkova, KU Leuven.

The book of Nathan Witkamp, a research fellow of the Netherlands Centre for Patristic Research, presents the first comprehensive comparative analysis of the baptismal rite and mystagogy in the Catechetical Homilies of Theodore of Mopsuestia and in the 21 and 22 memre of Narsai of Nisibis. Challenging the generally accepted view that Narsai had been primarily and significantly influenced by Theodore to the extent that up till now he was regarded as a mere copyist of his teacher, Witkamp demonstrates Narsai’s creativity in the use of Theodore’s material and of the sources of the East Syrian liturgical tradition.

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Women and Knowledge in Early Christianity

In Brill, Early Christianity, Gnosticism, Ivan Miroshnikov, Outi Lehtipuu, Patristics, Sarah Whitear, Ulla Tervahauta, Women on April 27, 2020 at 2:46 pm

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2020.04.08 | Ulla Tervahauta, Ivan Miroshnikov, Outi Lehtipuu and Ismo Dunderberg (eds.), Women and Knowledge in Early Christianity. Supplements to Vigiliae Christianae 144; Boston and Leiden: Brill 2017. Available in open Access.

Review by Sarah Whitear, KU Leuven.

Women and Knowledge in Early Christianity is an edited collection in honour of the retirement of Antti Marjanen, Professor of Gnosticism and Early Christian Literature at the University of Helsinki. The book is made up of fourteen essays split into four different sections. As explicated in the introduction, ‘women and knowledge’ can be understood in a variety of ways, and thus the book features studies on various areas from the role of the feminine in gnostic literature to the knowledge of real flesh and blood women. Read the rest of this entry »

Die Briefe des Ignatios von Antiochia

In Apostolic Fathers, De Gruyter, Ignatius, Jonathon Lookadoo, Patristics, Peter von MOLLENDORFF, Thomas Johann BAUER on October 29, 2019 at 11:24 am

2019.10.14 | Thomas Johann Bauer and Peter von Möllendorff, eds. Die Briefe des Ignatios von Antiochia: Motive, Strategien, Kontexte. Millennium-Studien 72. Berlin: De Gruyter, 2018. pp. viii + 288. ISBN: 9783110604467.

Review by Jonathon Lookadoo, Presbyterian University and Theological Seminary, Seoul, Republic of Korea.

This volume edited by Bauer and von Möllendorff finds its origins in papers that were delivered to the twenty-fifth meeting of the Internationale Arbeitsgemeinschaft “Zweites Jahrhundert” at the Benediktbeuern Abbey in September 2017. Nine essays are collected that explore Ignatius’s letters from a variety of angles while simultaneously offering a cross-section of the current multiplicity of scholarly opinions on the date, authenticity, authorship, and purpose of the letters. Read the rest of this entry »

Parabiblica Latina

In Apocrypha, Apostolic Fathers, Benjamin GLEEDE, Brill, Jonathon Lookadoo, Latin Christianity, Patristics, Translation on June 27, 2018 at 10:30 am

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2018.06.09 | Benjamin Gleede. Parabiblica Latina: Studien zu den griechisch-lateinischen Übersetzungen parabiblischer Literatur unter besonderer Berücksichtigung der apostolischen Väter. VCSup 137. Leiden: Brill, 2016. pp. viii + 392. ISBN: 9789004315945.

Review by Jonathon Lookadoo, Presbyterian University and Theological Seminary, Seoul, Republic of Korea.

As textual explorations and scholarly discussions of canonicity continue to develop in historical studies of the New Testament and early Christianity, Benjamin Gleede offers a thorough study of the Latin textual tradition of parabiblical texts. These are texts that are rarely included in canons of scripture but which seem to have held an authoritative place in at least some early Christian circles. The book is a published version of Gleede’s Habilitationsschrift, and the research was undertaken at the University of Zürich as part of the research project, Studien zur Übersetzungstechnik Rufins mit ausführlichem Glossar.

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Prokop von Gaza: Der Genesiskommentar

In De Gruyter, Karin Metzler, Late Antiquity, Manuscripts, Patristics, Prokop von Gaza, Samuel Pomeroy on April 13, 2018 at 12:18 pm

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2018.04.05 | Karin Metzler (ed). Prokop von Gaza. Eclogarum in libros historicos veteris testamenti epitome. Teil 1: Der Genesiskommentar. GCSnF, 22. Berlin–München–Boston: Walter de Gruyter, 2015. Pp. clxiv + 490. Hardcover.

Reviewed by Samuel Pomeroy, KU Leuven.

Choricius of Gaza praised his predecessor Procopius (c. 470–530) as a pagan sophist. Procopius’s literary output confirms no less a picture. With the publication of the text under review, Karin Metzler has advanced the serious study of Procopius from another angle, that of the biblical exegete—or what the manuscript tradition calls ‘Procopius the Christian sophist’ (xxxi).

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Isidore de Péluse, Lettres III

In Editions du Cerf, Egypt, Egyptian Christianity, Epistolography, Isidore of Pelusium, Late Antiquity, Letter collections, Madalina Toca, Monastic letters, Monasticism, Nicolas Vinel, Patristics, Pierre Évieux, Uncategorized on January 31, 2018 at 5:40 pm

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2018.01.03 | Pierre Évieux and Nicolas Vinel, eds. Isidore de Péluse, Lettres III (1701-2000). Sources Chrétiennes 586. Paris: Editions du Cerf, 2017.

Reviewed by Madalina Toca, KU Leuven.

Isidore de Péluse, Lettres III (1701-2000) is the third volume with Isidore’s letters in the Sources Chrétiennes series (SC 586), edited and translated in French by the late Pierre Évieux with the collaboration of Nicolas Vinel. Read the rest of this entry »

La Théologie Byzantine et sa tradition (VIe-VIIe siècles)

In Brepols, Byzantine theology, Carmelo Giuseppe Conticello, Mark W. ELLIOTT, Patristics, review on December 17, 2017 at 4:04 pm

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2017.12.27 | Carmelo Giuseppe Conticello (ed.), La Théologie Byzantine et sa tradition I/1 (VIe-VIIe siècles) (Corpus Christianorum; Turnhout: Brepols, 2015). IV+805pp.

Reviewed by Mark W. Elliott, University of St Andrews.

We are told at the outset of this large and handsome volume that theology will be understood more widely than just doctrinal issues to include political theology. (It might even include law.)

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The Intertextual Reception of Genesis 1–3 in Irenaeus of Lyons

In Brill, Eric Covington, Genesis, Irenaeus of Lyons, Patristic exegesis, Patristics, Reception history, Stephen O. PRESLEY on January 13, 2016 at 11:15 am

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2016.01.02 | Stephen O. Presley. The Intertextual Reception of Genesis 1–3 in Irenaeus of Lyons (The Bible in Ancient Christianity; Leiden: Brill, 2015). Hardback. 267 pages + 34 pages bibliography & indices.

Review by Eric Covington, University of St Andrews.

Many thanks to Brill Publishers for providing a MyBook paperback inspection copy.

In The Intertextual Reception of Genesis 1–3 in Irenaeus of Lyons, Stephen O. Presley examines every reference to Gen 1–3 in Adversus Haereses (Against Heresies, abbreviated hereafter as Haer.) to demonstrate how Irenaeus interprets Genesis’ protological narratives within an intertextual network spanning the entire biblical canon.
Presley argues that Irenaeus’ intertextual exegesis is an outworking of his particular view of scriptural consonance informed by his doctrine of revelation and creation. Read the rest of this entry »