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Archive for the ‘Stuart WEEKS’ Category

An Introduction to the Study of Wisdom Literature

In Bloomsbury, HB/OT, JiSeong Kwon, Stuart WEEKS, Wisdom Literature on May 12, 2014 at 11:50 am

9780567184436

2014.5.13 | Stuart Weeks. An Introduction to the Study of Wisdom Literature. T & T Clark Approaches to Biblical Studies. London and New YorkT & T Clark2010. Pp. ix + 165ISBN 9780567184436. Paperback.

Review by JiSeong Kwon, Durham University.

Many thanks to Bloomsbury for providing a review copy.

Stuart Weeks in this book provides a concise and insightful introduction to Israelite Wisdom Literature for beginners to biblical studies. The entire biblical wisdom corpus (including deuterocanonical texts) is reviewed—the book of Proverbs, the book of Job, Ecclesiastes, the wisdom psalms, the Wisdom of Ben Sira (Ecclesiasticus), Baruch 3.9-4.4, and the Wisdom of Solomon—as well as wisdom texts from Qumran. This scholarly work, however, is very distinctive compared with other sorts of introductory books of Wisdom Literature such as those by Roland E. Murphy, James Crenshaw, and Leo Perdue, in that Weeks carefully examines the conventional thoughts in terms of the origin and the cultural setting of ‘Wisdom Literature’. Read the rest of this entry »

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Ecclesiastes and Scepticism

In Bloomsbury, Ecclesiastes, Larisa Levicheva, Qoheleth, Stuart WEEKS on May 11, 2013 at 3:17 pm

EC

2013.05.08 | Stuart Weeks. Ecclesiastes and Scepticism. Library of Hebrew Bible/Old Testament Studies 541. New York: T&T Clark, 2012. Pp. xiv+219. Hard cover. ISBN 978-0-567-25288-3.

Review by Larisa Levicheva, Wesley Seminary, Indiana Wesleyan University.

Many thanks to Bloomsbury for kindly providing us with a review copy.

This book consists of five chapters with an introduction, a chapter with concluding remarks and an appendix which presents an in-depth study of the name “Qoheleth.” The Introduction outlines the following chapters and lays down the assumptions which guide Weeks’ study. Weeks offers a different reading of the book of Ecclesiastes which presents Qoheleth’s thoughts as personal grievance over the impotence of intellectual accomplishments and over the complete lack of control of one’s material gain. Read the rest of this entry »