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Archive for the ‘SEMINAR REPORTS’ Category

Tommy Wasserman, Thomas Kraus, Richard Bauckham, “A Day in Honour of Larry Hurtado”

In Devotion, Edgar Ebojo, Edinburgh, Larry HURTADO, Richard BAUCKHAM, SEMINAR REPORTS, Textual Criticism, Thomas KRAUS, Tommy WASSERMAN on October 28, 2011 at 9:41 am

This is a report on a conference at the University of Edinburgh, held in honour of the retirement of Prof. Larry W. Hurtado, Professor Emeritus of New Testament Language, Literature, and Theology, University of Edinburgh (UoE), 7th October 2011, 10:00 a.m.—4:30 p.m., Martin Hall, School of Divinity, New College building, University of Edinburgh. The conference programme is available here. Audio recording of the proceedings (lectures and the responses by Prof Hurtado) is available at website of Centre for the Study of Christian Origins (CSCO), here, courtesy of Mark Batluck, a local PhD researcher at Edinburgh. RBECS is also on facebook, here.

The chilly but otherwise rainless weather that day was far more preferable than the previous day, which was marked with erratic occasional rain showers, soaking many people wet especially during the rush hour. Together with a local postgrad researcher (PGR) from the University of Edinburgh, we braved our way through that chilly morning and arrived early at Martin Hall, New College, giving us the opportunity to meet other PGRs who are equally excited in attending the conference. Read the rest of this entry »

N.T. Wright’s Inaugural Lecture as Professor of New Testament and Early Christianity at the University of St Andrews, “Imagining the Kingdom: Mission and Theology in Early Christianity”

In David J. Larsen, N. T. WRIGHT, New Testament, NT Theology, SEMINAR REPORTS, St Andrews on October 27, 2011 at 6:18 pm

Last night I had the opportunity to listen to Professor Tom Wright (a.k.a. N.T. Wright) give his Inaugural Lecture as Professor of New Testament and Early Christianity here at the University of St Andrews. I share here my notes from the lecture. Please be aware that the following is based on rather skimpy hand-written notes, and so does not do justice to Wright’s elegant and precise handling of the English language, but I hope I have preserved the thrust of his arguments.  The speech was entitled:  ”Imagining the Kingdom: Mission and Theology in early Christianity.”

Wright begins by outlining how the four Gospels are remarkable documents that are still largely unknown to us. We are failing to understand the thrust of the Gospels. We need to apply our imagination and look beyond the boundaries of the various philosophies that guide our views.

(Wright will present a fresh thesis about the Gospels) Read the rest of this entry »

John Barton, “Law and Narrative in the Pentateuch”

In Edinburgh, HB/OT, John BARTON, Kerry Lee, Pentateuch, SEMINAR REPORTS on October 15, 2011 at 11:20 pm

A report on a paper given by Professor John Barton (Oriel College, Oxford University) at the Biblical Studies Seminar at New College, the University of Edinburgh, 14 October 2011.

The list of forthcoming papers in the Biblical Studies Seminars at Edinburgh can be downloaded from here. You can find RBECS on facebook, here.

Professor Barton’s paper was an exploration of the problem of the relationship between the legal and narrative texts of the Pentateuch. The paper consisted of six points/sections: (1) an introduction of the problem, (2) a review of the Jewish interpretive tradition which has foregrounded the legal texts, (3) a review of the Christian tradition which, in contrast, foregrounded the narrative texts but in a prophetic light, (4) an exploration of two broad purposes for narrative with a national scope (such as, but not limited to, royals annals), one positive and one negative, which would provide a rubric by which to foreground the narrative texts, (5) a third suggestion for the purpose of narratives which integrates the legal texts for the modern reader, and finally (6) a look ahead to some work which is breaking down the generic barriers between narrative and law, perhaps providing yet another solution to the problem. Read the rest of this entry »

Benjamin Schliesser, “The Dialectics of Faith and Doubt in Paul”

In Abraham, Benjamin SCHLIESSER, Cambridge, Disputing, Doubt, Faith, Meddling, Paul, Romans, Samuli Siikavirta, SEMINAR REPORTS on October 13, 2011 at 12:21 pm

A report on a paper given by Dr Benjamin Schliesser (Zürich University) at the Senior New Testament Seminar of the Faculty of Divinity, University of Cambridge, 11 October 2011.

The list of forthcoming papers in the New Testament Seminars at Cambridge can be found here. You can also find us on facebook, here.

Dr Schliesser’s paper began with the realisation that he had made when writing his PhD thesis: the notion of doubt has not been dealt with much at all in Pauline scholarship. The doubt of Don Quixote, Descartes, Luther and the modern sceptic were all mentioned as examples that shape our present-day definition of the word “doubt”: uncertainty, hesitation, lack of confidence and wavering between two positions.

Most of the paper focused on Romans 4:20 and Paul’s use of διακρίνεσθαι therein. Dr Schliesser carefully showed the discrepancy between the classical/Hellenistic meaning of the verb (“to be separated or to be dissolved [into elements]”, “to come to a decision or to get it decided” or “to contend or to dispute”) and the way in which it is usually read in the New Testament (“to contend with oneself” or simply “to doubt”). Read the rest of this entry »

N. T. Wright, “Scripture and God’s Authority: Case Studies and Further Questions”

In N. T. WRIGHT, Rebekah Devine, SEMINAR REPORTS, St Andrews, St Andrews Graduate Conference for Biblical and Early Christian Studies on September 28, 2011 at 9:54 pm

This is a report on a paper presented by Prof N. T. Wright as a keynote address at the 1st St Andrews Graduate Conference for Biblical and Early Christian Studies, 15 June 2011. The conference theme was “Authoritative Texts and Reception History”. The programme of the conference is available here.

The conference facebook page is here. This blog’s facebook page is here.

Wright’s paper addresses what he views as the most contested and problematic moment in reception history:  “The moment when those first-century Jews who believed that Jesus of Nazareth was Israel’s Messiah and the world’s Lord began to re-read their scriptures with this belief as the controlling filter.”  The paper is a re-presentation of the main issues examined in Wright’s book, Scripture and God’s Authority.  As is suggested by the title, Wright emphasizes that the authority of scripture is not in the text itself; rather, the authority of God is somehow mediated through the text.  Read the rest of this entry »

Configuring Communities: The Socio-Political Dimensions of Ancient Epistolography

In Durham, Epistolography, Lutz DOERING, New Testament, SEMINAR REPORTS on June 24, 2011 at 9:42 pm


Durham University

Department of Classics & Ancient History and Department of Theology & Religion

14-16 July 2011

The interdisciplinary conference “Configuring Communities” (Durham University, 14-16 July 2011) will investigate the complex socio-political dimensions of ancient epistolography, i.e. the ways in which the formal aspects of the genre interlock with processes of group formation and identity construction. The “communal” aspects of epistolary communication play themselves out in a variety of ways, e.g. with communities writing to individuals, individuals writing to communities, or communities writing to one another etc. These phenomena give rise to a range of heuristic interests: (1) the identity politics of character-drawing and selfpresentation; (2) corporate authorship and collective addressees; (3) functional equivalences – personal appearance, oral messenger, sending a letter; (4) community and confidentiality; (5) letters as means of communicating with geographically dispersed addressees; and (6) ancient epistolary theory. Read the rest of this entry »

John Barclay, “The Christ-Gift, Israel and Time: From Galatians to Romans”

In Cambridge, John BARCLAY, Paul, Samuli Siikavirta, SEMINAR REPORTS on May 30, 2011 at 9:32 pm

A report on a paper given by Professor John M.G. Barclay (Durham) at the Senior New Testament Seminar of the Faculty of Divinity, University of Cambridge, 17 May 2011

The list of forthcoming papers in the New Testament Seminars at Cambridge can be found here. You can also find us on facebook, here.

In what was clearly amongst the best-presented papers of the senior seminar series of this academic year, Professor John Barclay focused on the relationship between the Christ-gift and God’s plan. He painted his argument on the backdrop of the views of N.T. Wright and J.L. Martyn on the Christ-event and time. Barclay criticised both of them, admitting, though, that his own view was closer to that of Martyn’s: whereas Wright sees the crucifixion as the event that shocks Israel and unveils God’s apocalyptic plan, Martyn holds that the Christ-event creates a new cosmological moment in which the whole cosmos is put to a halt by the cross. Read the rest of this entry »

The 1st St Andrews Graduate Conference for Biblical and Early Christian Studies: Authoritative Texts and Reception History

In SEMINAR REPORTS, St Andrews on May 17, 2011 at 5:37 pm

With an emphasis on textual reception history, the first St Andrews Graduate Conference for Biblical and Early Christian Studies is aimed at graduate students and early career scholars.

Some details are offered here. The initial CfP is available here.

Authoritative Texts and Reception History

Aspects and Approaches. 15-16 June 2011

St Mary’s College, School of Divinity, University of St Andrews

Wednesday 15th June

9.00 am: Kristin de Troyer, On Reconstructing the History of the Biblical Text Read the rest of this entry »

John Moles, “The Lukan Preface”

In Durham, Greek Prologue, John MOLES, Justin A. Mihoc, Luke-Acts, New Testament, SEMINAR REPORTS on May 10, 2011 at 12:27 pm

This is a report on a paper presented by Professor John Moles, Professor of Latin in the School of Historical Studies, Newcastle University, at the New Testament Research Seminar at the Department of Theology and Religion, Durham University, 9th of May 2011.

The list of forthcoming papers in the NT Research Seminars at Durham University can be found here.

In a very engaging and interesting presentation, Prof Moles assessed the highly problematic and complex preface of Luke’s Gospel and its homologous secondary preface in Acts. The Lukan preface is relevant not only in the attempt to identify the genre of the work, but also to discover the author’s intention and objectives. The Lukan preface shows a unified piece of text, showing unity of theme and treatment at the same time, and it is detached from the diegesis. Read the rest of this entry »

Lena-Sofia Tiemeyer, “The Geographical and Theological Location of Isaiah 40-55”

In David J. Larsen, HB/OT, Lena-Sofia TIEMEYER, Scripture, SEMINAR REPORTS, St Andrews on March 24, 2011 at 12:55 pm

This is a report on a seminar paper presented by Dr Lena-Sofia Tiemeyer, Lecturer in Old Testament/Hebrew Bible School of Divinity, History and Philosophy, King’s College, University of Aberdeen, in the Biblical Studies Seminar at the School of Divinity, St Mary’s College, University of St Andrews, on 14 Oct 2010. This paper represents themes/material taken from Dr Tiemeyer’s recent major publication on Deutero-Isaiah entitled For the Comfort of Zion: The Geographical and Theological Location of Isaiah 40-55 (Vetus Testamentum Supplement 139, Leiden, Brill, 2011).

Dr Lena-Sofia Tiemeyer, in this seminar paper, challenged the academic status quo regarding the understanding of the location for the writing of the section of the Book of Isaiah known as 2nd or Deutero-Isaiah (Isa 40-55).  Read the rest of this entry »