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Archive for the ‘D. Allen Hutchison’ Category

Ezekiel and the World of Deuteronomy

In Bloomsbury, D. Allen Hutchison, Deuteronomy, Ezekiel, Jason Gile, T & T Clark on December 1, 2021 at 11:47 pm

2021.12.18 | Jason Gile. Ezekiel and the World of Deuteronomy. LHBOTS 703. London: T&T Clark, 2021. ISBN 9780567694317 (electronic version).

Review by D. Allen Hutchison, Stellenbosch University.

Ezekiel and the World of Deuteronomy by Jason Gile makes the strong case that the book of Deuteronomy was a significant influence on the book of Ezekiel. Gile is Dean of Program Development and Innovation and Affiliate Professor of Old Testament at Northern Seminary in Lisle, Illinois. Ezekiel and the World of Deuteronomy is the revision of his 2013 Ph.D. dissertation from Wheaton College Graduate School.

Gile acknowledges on the first page that the Holiness Code of Lev 17-26 is “the chief influence for Ezekiel” (1) but argues that Leviticus is not the only pentateuchal book to substantially influence the prophet and his book. Gile’s thesis is that Deuteronomy influenced Ezekiel “in significant ways” and “in some cases [Ezekiel] alluded to specific texts” from Deuteronomy (2).

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The Book of Kings and Exilic Identity

In 1 & 2 Kings, Ancient Israel, Bloomsbury, D. Allen Hutchison, HB/OT, Hebrew Bible, Nathan Lovell, T & T Clark on May 11, 2021 at 8:13 pm

2021.5.11 | Nathan Lovell. The Book of Kings and Exilic Identity: 1 and 2 Kings as a Work of Political Historiography. LHBOTS 708; London: Bloomsbury T&T Clark, 2021. ISBN 9780567695338 (electronic version).

Review by D. Allen Hutchison, Stellenbosch University.

The Book of Kings and Exilic Identity: 1 and 2 Kings as a Work of Political Historiography by Nathan Lovell is a persuasive macro-examination of 1-2 Kings developed through careful attention to the text’s details. Lovell is the Director of Research and a Senior Lecturer of Old Testament and Hebrew at George Whitefield College in Muizenberg, South Africa. The Book of Kings and Exilic Identity is the revision of his 2019 Ph.D. dissertation of the same name from the University of Sydney.

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