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Archive for the ‘Mohr Siebeck’ Category

The Resurrection of Jesus in the Gospel of John

In Craig R. KOESTER, Gospel of John, Josaphat Tam, Mohr Siebeck, New Testament, Reimund BIERINGER, Resurrection on July 19, 2013 at 5:20 pm

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2013.07.16 | Craig R. Koester and Reimund Bieringer, eds. The Resurrection of Jesus in the Gospel of John. WUNT 222. Tübingen: Mohr Siebeck, 2008. Pp. viii + 358. ISBN: 9783161495885.

Review by Josaphat Tam, University of Edinburgh.

Many thanks to Mohr Siebeck for providing us a review copy.

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This book is a collection of essays on an important topic desperately needed in Johannine studies, even up to now.  Many of the essays are from papers presented in various “Johannine Writings Seminars” of the Society for New Testament Studies (SNTS) over the period 2005—2007.  The thirteen essays cover various aspects of resurrection in the Gospel of John, from the motif itself, the resurrection appearances, to its connection with the cross, the farewell discourse, the Johannine signs, the ascension motif, the concept of remission of sin, and eschatology. Read the rest of this entry »

Pioneer and Perfecter of Faith

In Christology, Christopher A. RICHARDSON, Hebrews, Mohr Siebeck, Nicholas J. Moore, NT Theology, Paul, Pistis Christou on June 21, 2013 at 11:20 am

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2013.06.11 | Christopher A. Richardson. Pioneer and Perfecter of Faith: Jesus’ Faith as the Climax of Israel’s History in the Epistle to the Hebrews. WUNT II/338. Tübingen: Mohr Siebeck, 2012. XI, 280 pp. Paperback. ISBN 978 3 16 150397 9.

Review by Nicholas J. Moore, Keble College, University of Oxford.

The debate over pistis Christou – whether this phrase refers to faith in Christ or the faith(fulness) of Christ – has generated a large literature focussing mostly on a few verses in Paul. Christopher Richardson’s monograph argues that the concept of Jesus’ faithfulness is clearly present in the New Testament, but in a place that few engaged in the pistis Christou debate have thought to look for it: the Letter to the Hebrews. Richardson’s study (a revision of his doctoral thesis completed under Francis Watson at Aberdeen in 2009) traces references to Jesus’ faithfulness throughout Hebrews in order to demonstrate that this is a recurring and important theme. Read the rest of this entry »

The Mysticism of Hebrews

In Apocalyptic, Hebrews, Jody A. BARNARD, Mohr Siebeck, Mysticism, New Testament, Nicholas J. Moore, Paul on November 13, 2012 at 11:44 am

2012.11.16 | Jody A. Barnard, The Mysticism of Hebrews. Exploring the Role of Jewish Apocalyptic Mysticism in the Epistle to the Hebrews. Wissenschaftliche Untersuchungen zum Neuen Testament 2.331. Tübingen: Mohr Siebeck, 2012. XII + 341 pp. Paperback. ISBN: 9783161518812.

Reviewed by Nicholas J. Moore, Keble College, University of Oxford.

Many thanks to Mohr Siebeck for kindly providing us with a review copy.

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Scholarship on the Epistle to the Hebrews has tended to divide over the most pertinent background against which to read the letter. On the one hand, scholars such as Spicq, Moffatt, and more recently Kenneth Schenck and Gregory Sterling, have sought to locate Hebrews within a Middle Platonic philosophical framework, with Philo as the most important comparative author. On the other hand, Ronald Williamson, C. K. Barrett, L. D. Hurst and Scott Mackie among others have emphasised the Jewish apocalyptic background of the letter. Read the rest of this entry »

The Rhetorical Impact of the Semeia in the Gospel of John

In John, Josaphat Tam, Mohr Siebeck, Willis Hedley SALIER on February 18, 2012 at 1:41 am

2012.02.05 | Willis Hedley Salier, The Rhetorical Impact of the Semeia in the Gospel of John. WUNT 2/186. Tübingen: Mohr Siebeck, 2004. Pp. ix + 234. ISBN: 9783161484070.

Reviewed by Josaphat Tam, University of Edinburgh.

RBECS would like to thank Mohr Siebeck for kindly providing us with a review copy. You can find RBECS on facebook, here.

Published theses do not need to be long, and they need to be clear and to the point. Willis Salier’s thesis is one of them. This is the published version of the author’s doctoral thesis completed at the University of Cambridge in 2003, supervised by the late Graham Stanton and examined by Andrew Lincoln and James Carleton Paget. Consisting only of 187 pages of the main body with 56 pages of bibliography with indices, this monograph is well focused. It examines the language of σημεῖον (sign), a unique term in the Gospel of John and the way it operates within John’s rhetorical strategy. Read the rest of this entry »

Prophets and Prophecy in Jewish and Early Christian Literature

In Joseph VERHEYDEN, Korinna ZAMFIR, Michael J. Thate, Mohr Siebeck, Prophecy, Tobias NICKLAS on February 7, 2012 at 2:58 pm

2012.02.04 | Joseph Verheyden, Korinna Zamfir and Tobias Nicklas (eds.), Prophets and Prophecy in Jewish and Early Christian Literature, (WUNT II 286; Tübingen: Mohr Siebeck, 2010) pp. viii+359, €74 (paper). 978 3 16 150338 2; 0340 9570

Reviewed by Michael J. Thate, Durham University.

RBECS would like to thank Mohr Siebeck for kindly providing us with a review copy. You can find RBECS on facebook, here.

The collection of these essays grew out of the 2006 Conference on “Prophets and Prophecy in the Old and New Testament” organized by the Centre for Biblical Studies at Babeș-Bolyai University in Cluj, Romania. The essays by Walter Dietrich, Johannes Klein, Ulrich Luz, and Hans Klein were later incorporated into the volume from their original publication in Sacra Scripta 1 (2007). Read the rest of this entry »

Eschatologie – Eschatology

In Ben Sira, Christof LANDMESSER, Eschatology, Hans-Joachim ECKSTEIN, Hermann LICHTENBERGER, Michael J. Thate, Mohr Siebeck on February 4, 2012 at 8:07 am

2012.02.03 | Hans-Joachim Eckstein, Christof Landmesser and Hermann Lichtenberger (eds.), Eschatologie – Eschatology: The Sixth Durham-Tübingen Research Symposium: Eschatology in Old Testament, Ancient Judaism and Early Christianity (Tübingen, September, 2009) (WUNT I 272; Tübingen: Mohr Siebeck, 2011).

Reviewed by Michael J. Thate, Durham University.

RBECS would like to thank Mohr Siebeck for kindly providing us with a review copy. You can find RBECS on facebook, here.

There has been an ongoing fruitful partnership between the Theology Faculties of Durham University and Tübingen University. The partnership is, in part, a product of the friendship of C. K. Barrett and Ernst Käsemann. Read the rest of this entry »

Revelation and Concealment of Christ: A Theological Inquiry into the Elusive Language of the Fourth Gospel

In John, Josaphat Tam, Mohr Siebeck, Saeed HAMID-KHANI on January 24, 2012 at 9:30 am

2012.01.01 | Saeed Hamid-Khani, Revelation and Concealment of Christ: A Theological Inquiry into the Elusive Language of the Fourth Gospel. WUNT 2/120. Tübingen: Mohr Siebeck, 2000. Pp. xx + 572. ISBN: 3161471385.

Reviewed by Josaphat Tam, University of Edinburgh.

RBECS would like to thank Mohr Siebeck for kindly providing us with a review copy. You can find RBECS on facebook, here.

Very often new and good monographs capture the attention of reviewers and the not-so-new ones would just slip away. The present monograph is one of them. Read the rest of this entry »

Review Article: F.W. Horn and R. Zimmermann, Jenseits von Indikativ und Imperativ

In Friedrich Wilhelm HORN, Mohr Siebeck, New Testament, NT Ethics, Paul, Ruben ZIMMERMANN, Samuli Siikavirta on January 19, 2011 at 7:28 pm

2011.01.03 | F.W. Horn and R. Zimmermann, eds. Jenseits von Indikativ und Imperativ: Kontexte und Normen neutestamentlicher Ethik / Contexts and Norms of New Testament Ethics, vol. 1, (Wissenschaftliche Untersuchungen zum Neuen Testament 238), Tübingen: Mohr Siebeck, 2009. ISBN 978-3-16-149997-5. Cloth.

Review article by Samuli Siikavirta, University of Cambridge.

We extend our thanks to Mohr Siebeck for providing us with a review copy.

It is only in the recent years that some scholars have begun to criticise the indicative/imperative division of New Testament ethics that was first presented by P. Wernle in 1897 and popularised by R. Bultmann in his 1924 essay.Truthfully to its name, Jenseits von Indikativ und Imperativ [Beyond the Indicative and Imperative] delves into the recent criticism via 17 articles (two of which are in English) that present ways of going beyond the indicative and imperative. The book is the result of a round-table discussion on the foundations of New Testament ethics that took place in Germany in 2007. Read the rest of this entry »