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Archive for 2022|Yearly archive page

Studies on the Intersection of Text, Paratext, and Reception

In Brill, Charles E. HILL, Gregory R. Lanier, J. Nicholas Reid, Manuscript Studies, Manuscripts, Matthew Burks, Textual Criticism on April 8, 2022 at 7:35 pm

2022.04.05 | Gregory R. Lanier and J. Nicholas Reid. Studies on the Intersection of Text, Paratext, and Reception: A Festschrift in Honor of Charles E. Hill. Texts and Editions for New Testament Study 15. Leiden: Brill, 2021. pp. xxvii + 414.

Review by Matthew Burks, New Orleans Baptist Theological Seminary.

This book is a festschrift dedicated to Charles Hill on his 65th birthday. Dr. Hill currently holds the title of Professor Emeritus at the Reformed Theological Seminary in Orlando, Florida. The broad range and purpose of the book is to update each of the fields of Hill’s interest and earlier research to “bring together the latest research on each of these subfields and explore how they can and should inform each other” (p. xi).

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Scripture, Texts, and Tracings

In A. Andrew DAS, Anthony Royle, Fortress Press, Intertextuality, Lexington Books, Linda L. BELLEVILLE, Romans, Scripture, Septuagint on March 26, 2022 at 2:00 pm
Book cover

2022.03.04 | Linda L. Belleville and A. Andrew Das (eds.). Scripture, Texts, and Tracings in Romans. London: Lexington Books/Fortress Academic, 2021. pp. xiii + 267. ISBN: 978-1-9787-0471-8.

Review by Anthony P. Royle, University of Glasgow.

Scripture, Texts, and Tracing in Romans is a collection of twelve essays presented at the Society of Biblical Literature seminar on Scripture and Paul from 2017 and 2018. This is the second edited volume in a planned four volume series. (The previous volume on 1 Corinthians was edited by Linda Belleville and B. J. Oropeza.) In this volume Andrew Das is co-editor with Belleville, who also contribute two chapters alongside notable senior Pauline scholars invited to deliver papers to the seminar.

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Embodied God

In Bodies of God, Brittany E. WILSON, Luke-Acts, Matthew Sharp, Oxford University Press on March 14, 2022 at 1:57 pm

2022.03.03 | Brittany E. Wilson, The Embodied God: Seeing the Divine in Luke-Acts and the Early Church. New York: Oxford University Press, 2021. pp. xvi + 333. ISBN: 9780190080822. 

Review by Matthew Sharp, University of St Andrews.

God’s body (or bodies) has proved a fruitful and fascinating area of research for over a decade now, occupying scholars of the Hebrew Bible, ancient Near East, Graeco-Roman religion, and the religions of late antiquity. With this book Brittany Wilson adds the New Testament to this conversation as she seeks to dismantle modern Christian-Platonic notions of an invisible incorporeal God and argues forcefully for a portrayal of God in Luke-Acts that is visible, bodily, and capable of a variety of corporeal manifestations.

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Pain and Paradox in 2 Corinthians

In 2 Corinthians, B. G. White, Benjamin G. White, Isaac T. Soon, Mohr Siebeck, paradox, suffering on February 21, 2022 at 3:28 pm

2022.02.02 | Benjamin G. White. Pain and Paradox in 2 Corinthians: The Transformative Function of Strength in Weakness. Wissenschaftliche Untersuchungen zum Neuen Testament II 555. Tübingen: Mohr Siebeck, 2021. ISBN 9783161599118.

Review by Isaac T. Soon, Crandall University.

This monograph—a lightly revised version of the author’s dissertation at Durham University—offers a re-reading of 2 Corinthians through Paul’s strength and weakness paradox. The aim of the book is to correct the dominant approach to 2 Corinthians that conceives of Paul’s letter as fundamentally a defence of his apostleship and ministry. As an alternative, White argues that 2 Corinthians should be read primarily as a demonstration of Paul’s pastoral ministry to the Corinthian congregation. This is not to say, however, that Paul’s apologetic rhetoric is superfluous, but rather that it is in service of his ministerial goal, to comfort and provide concrete transformative strategies to a congregation in pain. 

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Divine Discourse in the Epistle to the Hebrews

In Cambridge University Press, Hebrews, Jonathan Rowlands, Madison N. Pierce, New Testament on February 13, 2022 at 9:48 pm

2022.02.01 | Madison N. Pierce. Divine Discourse in the Epistle to the Hebrews: The Recontextualization of Spoken Quotations of Scripture. Society of New Testament Studies Monograph Series 178; Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2020. ISBN: 9781108495417.

Review by Jonathan Rowlands, St. Mellitus College.

In this monograph, Pierce argues that “the author of Hebrews uses divine discourse—the speech of God—in Hebrews to develop his characterization of God and by extension his broader argument … [such that] these speeches are crucial to his argumentation.” (2). This argument is made primarily with reference to the author’s use of ‘prosopological exegesis’ of Jewish Scriptures. This technique “interprets texts by assigning ‘faces’ (πρόσωπα), or characters, to ambiguous or unspecified personal (or personified) entities represented in the text in question … for clarity of understanding” (4). Following a discussion about prosopological exegesis in antiquity (6-20) and techniques for identifying its use (20-22), Pierce introduces the particular use of this technique in Hebrews, culminating in an overview of previous treatments of divine speech in Hebrews (28-33).

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